Monday, November 23, 2015

IMO Recognizes Courageous Acts at Sea -By MarEx 2015-11-20 15:22:22

 

On Thursday, the IMO honored seafarers for their impressive and courageous acts in challenging conditions at sea. 

The main award (the Bravery Award) was presented to Aviation Survival Technician Christopher Leon (from the U.S.) for his professional and courageous acts in a demanding operation, saving four competition rowers in distress at sea with their boat in a hurricane.

Three rowers, along with Colin Parker from New Zealand, had been taking part in part in the Great Pacific Race in June 2014 when their four-man boat Britannia 4 began sinking in severe conditions. The race support vessel had been unable to reach the stricken rowing boat and its crew due to 30 knot winds and 15 to 20-foot waves. The rowers owe their lives to the efforts of rescue swimmer Leon, who had been lowered to the sea to assist them, and to the successful hoists performed by the helicopter crew in conditions compounded by darkness, lack of visual cues and horizon and breaking waves.

Speaking at the ceremony, Leon said he was pleased to meet the rescuees for the first time since the fateful night, and in entirely different circumstances. He said he was honored and humbled to be receiving the award and thanked his fellow crew members who had flown the helicopter through gale force winds to winch Leon down to the rowers in the stormy seas below and who had performed a series of demanding recovery hoists to initially rescue three of the men.

When fuel levels on the helicopter became dangerously low and it had to leave the scene to refuel, Leon remained with the fourth man, Hart, huddled in the tiny bow portion of the swamped vessel that remained above water. The two men protected each other from the breaking waves and freezing temperatures. Finally, the helicopter was able to return through the stormy night and hoist the two men to safety.

“I would especially like to thank the crew of the helicopter, Lieutenant Scott Black, Lieutenant Jesse C Keyser and flight mechanic Michael Spraggins, because nothing I do can be done without them; and everything we do is a team effort – especially for this case,” Leon said.

 

…read more at http://maritime-executive.com/article/imo-recognizes-courageous-acts-at-sea

Letters of Commendation 

• Captain Lai Zhixing, Master of the rescue vessel Nan Hai Jiu 111, Nanhai Rescue Bureau, nominated by China, for a rescue during Typhoon Kalmaegi.

• The crew of the Xinfa Hai, nominated by China, for saving the cargo vessel Thor Commander near the Great Barrier Reef.

• Petty Officer William Hubert and two crew members of the helicopter Rescue Tango, Detachment of 35F flotilla at Tahiti-Faa’a, French Navy, nominated by France for rescuing 10 crew members of a fishing boat.

 

Monday, November 9, 2015

SHIPPERS  REQUIREMENT TO DECLARE CONTAINER WEIGHT ACCURATELY

The International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), which met at the Organization's London headquarters for its 94th session, from 17-21 November 2014, approved draft SOLAS amendments which included addressing the continuing industry concern over the (mis-)declaration of weights for containers consigned for shipment.

The amendments to SOLAS Chapter VI state that authorities will "require mandatory verification of the gross mass of containers, either by weighing the packed container; or weighing all packages and cargo items, using a certified method approved by the competent authority of the State in which packing of the container was completed."

Under these regulations the "correct weight", or "verified weight", shall be determined in one of two ways:

1.    By weighing the loaded container at an approved weighing station; or

2.    By ensuring that all the individual items in the container are weighed and added to the container's weight.

The shipper will be responsible for verification of the weight of a container carrying cargo. The shipper is also responsible for ensuring that the verified weight is communicated in the shipping documents sufficiently in advance to be used by the ship's master or his representative and the terminal representative in the preparation of the ship stowage plan. In the absence of the shipper providing the verified weight of the packed container, it should be considered that the container should not be loaded on to the ship unless the master or his representative and the terminal representative have obtained the verified weight through other means.

The SOLAS requirements are expected to enter into force in July 2016 (see MSC.1/Circ.1475 republished alongside this note).

 

Friday, November 6, 2015

Bulk Carrier Perspective- Clarksons

BULK MARKETS

Market

Unit

2014

2015

5 Yr Min

5 Yr Max

Capesize 1 yr

$/Day

22,366

16,636

8,850

33,000

Panamax 1 yr

$/Day

12,035

11,235

6,250

22,625

Capesize NB

$ Million

54

51

46

58

Panamax NB

$ Million

29

28.6

25.8

34.5

Ultramax NB

$ Million

27

26.7

24.3

31

Capesize 5 yr old

$ Million

39

39.4

31

55.5

Panamax 5 yr old

$ Million

20

23.9

16.5

39.5

Dry Bulk Trade

Million Tonnes

4,550

4,279

3,841

4,569

 

Soft trade figures and  an oversupply of tonnage continue to make for a poor market.